Android device on Mac

Android device on Mac
  1. Android Odds are decent that simply plugging in your device will “just work.” You can see if Android recognizes your device by running adb devices in a shell (e.g., OS X Terminal), where adb is in your platform-tools/ directory of your SDK. If you get output similar to the following, Android detected your device:
    List of devices attached HT9CPP809576 device
    If you are running Ubuntu (or perhaps another Linux variant) and this command did not work, you may need to add some udev rules. For example, here is a 51-android.rules file that will handle the devices from a handful of manufacturers:
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}=="0bb4", MODE="0666"
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}=="22b8", MODE="0666"
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}=="18d1", MODE="0666"
    SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="18d1", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0c01", MODE="0666",

    OWNER="[me]"
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}=="19d2", SYSFS{idProduct}=="1354", MODE="0666" SUBSYSTEM=="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}=="04e8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="681c", MODE="0666"

    Drop that in your /etc/udev/rules.d directory on Ubuntu, and then either reboot the computer or otherwise reload the udev rules (e.g., sudo service udev reload). Then, unplug the device, plug it in again, and see if it is detected. 
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Android Device on Windows

Android Device on Windows


When you first plug in your Android device, Windows attempts to find a driver for it. It is possible that, by virtue of other software you have installed, the driver is ready for use. If Windows finds a driver, you are probably ready to go.
If Windows doesn’t find the driver, here are some options for getting one:
  •  Windows Update: Some versions of Windows (e.g., Vista) prompt you to search Windows Update for drivers. This is certainly worth a shot, though not every device manufacturer will have supplied its device’s driver to Microsoft.
  •  Standard Android driver: In your Android SDK installation, you will find a google-usb_driver directory, containing a generic Windows driver for Android devices. You can try pointing the driver wizard at this directory to see if it thinks this driver is suitable for your device.
  •  Manufacturer-supplied driver: If you still do not have a driver, search the CD that came with the device (if any) or search the web site of the device manufacturer. Motorola, for example, has drivers available for all of its devices in one spot for download. 

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Android Stuff at Disposal

Android Stuff at Disposal

Storage: You can package data files with your application for things that do not change, such as icons or help files. You also can carve out a small bit of space on the device itself, for databases or files containing user-entered or retrieved data needed by your application. And, if the user supplies bulk storage, like an SD card, you can read and write files on there as needed. 
Network: Android devices generally are Internet-ready, through one communications medium or another. You can take advantage of the Internet access at any level you wish, from raw Java sockets all the way up to a built-in WebKit-based web browser widget you can embed in your application.
Multimedia: Android devices have the ability to play back and record audio and video. While the specifics may vary from device to device, you can query the device to learn its capabilities and then take advantage of the multimedia capabilities as you see fit, whether that is to play back music, take pictures with the camera, or use the microphone for audio note-taking.
Location services: Android devices frequently have access to location providers, such as GPS and cell triangulation, which can tell your applications where the device is on the face of the Earth. In turn, you can display maps or otherwise take advantage of the location data, such as to track a device’s movements if the device has been stolen.
Phone services: Because Android devices are typically phones, your software can initiate calls, send and receive SMS messages, and do everything else you expect from a modern bit of telephony technology. 


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Project Structure in Android


Project Structure in Android 

The Android build system is organized around a specific directory tree structure for your Android project, much like any other Java project. The specifics, though, are fairly unique to Android—the Android build tools do a few extra things to prepare the actual application that will run on the device or emulator. Here’s a quick primer on the project structure, to help you make sense of it all.

Root Contents
When you create a new Android project (e.g., via android create project), you get several items in the project’s root directory, including the following:
  •  AndroidManifest.xml: An XML file that describes the application being built and what components (activities, services, etc.) are being supplied by that application
  •  bin/: The directory that holds the application once it is compiled
  •  libs/: The directory that holds any third-party JARs your application
    requires
  •  res/: The directory that holds resources, such as icons, GUI layouts, and the like, that are packaged with the compiled Java in the application 


  • src/: The directory that holds the Java source code for the application 


In addition to the preceding file and directories, you may find any of the following in Android projects:
  •  assets/: The directory that holds other static files that you want packaged with the application for deployment onto the device
  •  gen/: The directory in which Android’s build tools place source code that they generate
  •  build.xml and *.properties: Files that are used as part of the Ant- based command-line build process, if you are not using Eclipse
  •  proguard.cfg: A file that is used for integration with ProGuard to obfuscate your Android code 


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Intents in Android

Intents in Android

  • Intents are system messages that run around the inside of the device and notify applications of various events, from hardware state changes (e.g., an SD card was inserted), to incoming data (e.g., a Short Message Service [SMS] message arrived), to application events (e.g., your activity was launched from the device’s main menu). Intents are much like messages or events on other operating systems. Not only can you respond to an Intent, but you can create your own to launch other activities or to let you know when specific situations arise (e.g., raise such-and-so Intent when the user gets within 100 meters of this-and-such location). 


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